Radio College

What you didn't know you needed to know about college radio.

KNDS at North Dakota State University has the most adorable little favicon I have ever seen. Favicon is the proper name for that little picture that shows up next to the name of the website in your browser tab. If a station doesn’t have a teeny tiny version of its logo to use, go with something like this. WikiMedia has a few Creative Commons images of headphones you can use with attribution. The image must be converted to a 16 x 16 .ico file, which can be done using the website Favicon.cc.

KNDS at North Dakota State University has the most adorable little favicon I have ever seen. Favicon is the proper name for that little picture that shows up next to the name of the website in your browser tab. If a station doesn’t have a teeny tiny version of its logo to use, go with something like this. WikiMedia has a few Creative Commons images of headphones you can use with attribution. The image must be converted to a 16 x 16 .ico file, which can be done using the website Favicon.cc.


Whether they have shiny new equipment or broadcast from an used equipment closet, college radio stations usually attract a fascinating mix of personalities including long-time community voices, insomniacs, alt-rock geeks, media students, armchair psychologists and opinionated activists.

College Radio on Wikipedia

Wikipedia can be a great tool to convey information about your college radio station, but many stations do not take full advantage of it. By far, the best college wikipedia page belongs to WLRA at Lewis University. It provides a lot of historical information, including a list of past general managers, technical achievements and notable alumni.

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DIY Broadcast Clock

I’ve always been fascinated by the broadcast clock. My training in commercial and public radio made me acutely aware that things needed to be EXACT - not one second over or under. I always kept scrap paper in the studio to tally song times. College radio, however, is a lesson in lax. I don’t think I could teach a student to backtime to the top of the hour if I tried.

The first clock I made myself was a stolen borrowed copy of a public radio clock for a program that had one short break at the bottom of the hour. I opened the image in Paint, erased the break marks and the show’s title, and hit print. The actual clock would need to be handwritten and use a ruler, but it worked.

Years ago I came across the Broadcast Clock Creator. It’s fancy and all, but anything that costs more than free is likely out of the price range or just not worth it for college radio stations. It’s just as easy to create your own template using Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet program.

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To see some broadcast clocks used by public radio programs, check out WNYC’s Tumblr for “Take a trip inside the magical world of the book of clocks" and "The book of clocks part 2.”




Here is another interesting college radio logo, this one from WZBT at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pa. The orange and blue (the school’s colors) work very well together. I especially like the choice of orange for the outside ring rather than inside. The font spelling out the call letters is a great contrast with the second font.

Here is another interesting college radio logo, this one from WZBT at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pa. The orange and blue (the school’s colors) work very well together. I especially like the choice of orange for the outside ring rather than inside. The font spelling out the call letters is a great contrast with the second font.


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KGSM The Phoenix is student radio from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota. The choice of a phoenix is especially appropriate, as the station suffered a horrific computer crash in 2007, forcing the station to rebuild and rise from the digital ashes.

KGSM The Phoenix is student radio from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota. The choice of a phoenix is especially appropriate, as the station suffered a horrific computer crash in 2007, forcing the station to rebuild and rise from the digital ashes.


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